Helmholtz-Institute Ulm
Wetsus
PEC



Summary of Symposia

Symposium 1:
New Horizons in Analytical Electrochemistry (details)

Symposium 2:
Nanostructured Materials in Electroanalytical Chemistry (details)

Symposium 3:
New Approaches for Interfacing Electrochemistry and Biological Systems (details)

Symposium 4:
Electrochemical Approaches in Diseases and Human Health (details)

Symposium 5:
Current Progress in Microbial Electrochemical Technologies (details)

Symposium 6:
Novel Materials and Devices for Energy Storage: Batteries for Tomorrow’s World (details)

Symposium 7:
Novel Materials and Devices for Energy Conversion and Storage:
Fuel Cells, Electrolysers, Regenerative Fuel Cells and Flow Batteries
(details)

Symposium 8:
Novel Materials and Devices for Energy Storage: Capacitors (details)

Symposium 9:
Capacitive Electrodes for Environmental Technology (details)

Symposium 10:
Electroactive, Functionalized and Nanostructured Materials and Composites: Modern Trends in Synthesis and Applications (details)

Symposium 11:
Electrochemical Engineering for Improvement of Process Sustainability (details)

Symposium 12:
EC Power Sources: Principles of Materials, Design and Operation (details)

Symposium 13:
Corrosion: The Electrochemistry of Corrosion and Approaches to Corrosion Protection (details)

Symposium 14:
Combined Electro and Electrophoretic Deposition for Advanced Materials Synthesis (details)

Symposium 15:
New Molecules – Synthesis, Fundamental Electron Transfer Properties and their Relationship with Molecular Action (details)

Symposium 16:
Physical and Interfacial Electrochemistry: Progress in Spectroscopy, Imaging and Theoretical Analysis (details)

Symposium 17:
“Attention: Theory Only” (details)

Symposium 18:
Electrochemistry, Photo-Electrochemistry and Bioelectrochemistry of Artificial Photosynthesis : Recent Advances in CO2 Conversion to Products (details)

Symposium 19:
Electrochemistry in Action (details)

Symposium 20:
General Session (details)



Symposium 1:

New Horizons in Analytical Electrochemistry
Sponsored by: Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry

Our quest to better understand and more effectively measure the world around us drives advances in electroanalytical chemistry from many directions. New and optimised instrumental techniques that are aimed at filling gaps and addressing shortcomings in established methods have to be developed. Sophisticated data analysis methodologies to improve reliability of analyses and help unravel complex systems are sought. Research continues on novel electroanalytical protocols that can enable convenient monitoring of newly identified analytes important to human and environmental health. Finally, electroanalytical systems will have to provide faster analyses, at lower cost and be more portable and more automated. This symposium will highlight recent advances in all these areas of analytical electrochemistry.

Symposium Organizers

Thomas Doneux (Coordinator), Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium (tdoneux@ulb.ac.be)
Annemie Adriaens
, Universiteit Gent, Belgium
Priscilla Baker
, University of Western Cape, South Africa
Fethi Bedioui
, Chimie ParisTech, France

 


Symposium 2:

Nanostructured Materials in Electroanalytical Chemistry
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry

The nano era has a growing effect on electroanalytical chemistry. The ability to form an enormous variety of nano-objects ranging from nanoparticles to nanorods, nanotubes and many more asymmetric objects, has led to new opportunities for measuring lower concentrations in smaller volumes and with higher selectivity. Nanostructured materials can be used to modify electrode surfaces, be applied as nanoelectrodes and at the same time be used as a means of studying electrocatalytic processes used in electroanalysis.
Naturally, the implementation of nanomaterials in electroanalytical chemistry is an inherently interdisciplinary field of research, which requires bridging between analytical, physical chemistry and synthetic approaches. Yet, the benefits of this combination and integration are colossal as it truly makes it possible to design electroanalytical probes on a molecular scale.
This symposium aims to bring together electrochemists involved in different aspects of nanotechnology and nanochemistry to explore the impacts of the nanoscale on electroanalytical chemistry.


Symposium Organizers
Daniel Mandler (Coordinator), Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel (daniel.mandler@mail.huji.ac.il)
Alison Downard, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
Stanley Lai, Twente University, the Netherlands
Liza Rassaei, Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands


Symposium 3:

New Approaches for Interfacing Electrochemistry and Biological Systems
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry

The symposium covers all general aspects of bioelectrochemistry, but will be particularly focused on new approaches for interfacing biological systems and electrochemistry, including new systems and measurement principles for the study of bioelectrochemical processes. Preparation, electrochemical characterization and application of new biomaterials with precisely controlled properties will be discussed.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
-Properties and design of biological systems -electrode interfaces
-New strategies for electrode modification with enzymes, nucleic acids, organelles, cells and biomimetic systems
-Tailored protein, nucleic acid and cellular structures in bioelectrocatalysis and molecular recognition
-Experimental and theoretical studies of biological processes by electrochemical methods
-Bioenergetic and photobioelectrochemical systems
-Preparation and modification of biomaterials such as protecting layers of sensors, -3D structures for incorporation of biomolecules and cells
-Biomaterial properties with respect to in vitro and in vivo stability, corrosion, release of certain species, interaction with cells and tissue


Symposium Organizers
Elena Ferapontova (Coordinator), Aarhus University, Denmark (elena.ferapontova@inano.au.dk)
Renata Bilewicz, University of Warsaw, Poland
Karolien de Wael, University of Antwerp, Belgium
Serge Lemay, Twente University, the Netherlands
Fred Lisdat, Technical University of Wildau, Germany


Symposium 4:

Electrochemical Approaches in Diseases and Human Health
Sponsored by: Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

Electrochemistry plays important roles in approaching fundamentals of diseases and developing medicines and medical devices to improve human health. The symposium covers the broad field of science and technology where electrochemistry is utilized for medical research and applications.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Electrochemistry in medical diagnosis
• Electrochemical detection of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species
• Electrochemistry of oxidative stress based diseases and immune responses
• Electrochemistry of disease targeted molecules
• Brain electrochemistry
• Electrochemistry in cell signaling and communication
• Electrochemistry of membrane, lipid vesicles, and drug carriers
• Electrochemistry in the design and development of medical technologies and devices
• Electrochemically prepared compounds and materials for medical applications
• Medical devices at the interface of biology and electrochemistry


Symposium Organizers
Woonsup Shin (Coordinator), Sogang University, Korea (shinws@sogang.ac.kr)
Fethi Bedioui, Chimie ParisTech, France
Marilia O. F. Goulart, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil
Susan M. Lunte, University of Kansas, USA
Lanqun Mao, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China


Symposium 5:

Current Progress in Microbial Electrochemical Technologies
Sponsored by: Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology

This vibrant symposium aims to gather current research in the field of microbial electrochemical technologies, including both electroseparations and electroconversions. The key advances towards in-depth electrochemical theory and engineering will be addressed, as well as new approaches on the application of transient electrochemical techniques and in situ electrochemical methods for a better understanding of microbial electrochemical systems. The symposium will address a wide variety of applications ranging from power generation, co-generation of chemicals and electricity, resource recovery, desalination, electrosynthesis and intensification of coupled processes. Research presenting original and coherent modeling strategies to explain the electrochemical phenomena encountered in microbial electrochemical systems is encouraged. Electrochemical engineering can contribute to better reactor designs and process control, therefore these aspects applied to microbial electrochemical technology are also covered.

Symposium Organizers
Xochitl Dominguez-Benetton (Coodinator), Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Belgium (xoch@vito.be)
Bert Hamelers, Wetsus, the Netherlands
Korneel Rabaey, Universiteit Gent, Belgium
Uwe Schröder, TU Braunschweig, Germany


Symposium 6:

Novel Materials and Devices for Energy Storage: Batteries for Tomorrow’s World
Sponsored by: Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

The next generation of advanced rechargeable batteries will continue to rely on Li-ion chemistry, possibliy with the integration of alloying, conversion and conversion-alloying anode materials. Post Li-ion systems — such as Li-S, Li-air, Na-ion — are expected to enter the market, however, in the foreseeable future. Irrespective of the technology, the development of a detailed understanding of the fundamental properties of battery materials and the interactions of these materials with their environment will be the key to further improvements in the energy density, safety, and lifetime of batteries. The electrolyte is also crucial for the improvements of these devices, especially with respect to safety. This symposium is therefore devoted to recent progress in the fundamental science related to batteries, especially for advanced battery systems. Studies related to all other (applied) aspects of batteries, including solid-state electrolytes, are also welcome.

Symposium Organizers
Stefano Passerini (Coordinator), Helmholtz Institute Um/Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany (stefano.passerini@kit.edu)
Erik Kelder, Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands
Robert Kostecki, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, USA
Fokko Mulder, Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands
Peter Notten, Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands
Marnix Wagemaker, Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands


Symposium 7:

Novel Materials and Devices for Energy Conversion and Storage: Fuel Cells, Electrolysers, Regenerative Fuel Cells and Flow Batteries
Sponsored by: Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

The focus of this symposium is on cell, stack and functional materials for all types of low and high temperature fuel cells, regenerative fuel cells and flow batteries, as well as electrochemical generation of hydrogen by water electrolysis and synthetic fuels by electrolysis of CO2 and steam.
Particular emphasis will be given to in situ and operando characterisation and performance diagnostics, and to recent materials developments for durable cell components, as well as modelling studies to improve understanding of electrochemical reaction processes, transport and degradation phenomena. Novel chemistries and cell designs are also included.


Symposium Organizers
Matthias Arenz (Coordinator), University of Copenhagen, Denmark (m.arenz@chem.ku.dk)
Andreas Friedrich, German Aerospace Center, Germany
Anne Hauch, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
Robert Savinell, Case Western Reserve University, USA


Symposium 8:

Novel Materials and Devices for Energy Storage: Capacitors
Sponsored by: Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

This symposium addresses all fundamental and practical aspects on electrochemical capacitor research, development and applications. Topics include capacitor performance for power uses such as electric vehicles and energy storage application as well as advanced materials for capacitors (e.g., carbonaceous materials and their composites, polymers, inorganic materials). Novel insights into capacitors, such as computer simulations and in situ study of electrode/electrolyte interfaces, new designs/concepts for fabricating high performance devices, and synthesis of advanced electrolytes are welcome.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance of porous materials
• Materials with primarily faradaic pseudocapacitance: metal oxides, nitrides, sulfides, and other advanced inorganic materials, and conducting polymers
• Pseudocapacitance related to redox reactions at the carbon/electrolyte interface: iodides, quinones
• Characterization methods for physical structures and fundamental electrochemical processes of new electrode materials and architectures
• Optimization of components: current collectors, electrodes, electrolytes, separators, and packaging
• Hybrid capacitors: lithium ion capacitor and other related systems
• Design of new devices and hybrid systems combining capacitors and other power sources (e.g., batteries, fuel cells)
• Capacitor modeling for predicting performances of materials and devices
• New electrolytes for capacitors (redox active electrolytes and ionic liquids)
• Aging and corrosion phenomena in capacitors

Symposium Organizers
Elzbieta Frackowiak (Coordinator), Poznan University of Technology, Poland (elzbieta.frackowiak@put.poznan.pl)
Peter Coenen, VITO, Belgium
Wataru Sugimoto, Shinshu University, Japan


Symposium 9:

Capacitive Electrodes for Environmental Technology
Sponsored by: Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology

Electrochemical technologies based on porous electrodes for environmental applications (aqueous solutions) have long been employed to provide innovative solutions to important environmental challenges. Porous electrodes generally use capacitive processes (electrical double layer formation), in combination with faradaic chemical conversions. Well-recognized examples include pollutant separation and transformation, capacitive deionization of brackish water and seawater, and energy generation from environmental gradients in salinity or CO2. Recent advances in preparation, understanding, and design of porous electrodes (e.g., the incorporation of nanomaterials, the use of hierarchical structures, and the elucidation of interfacial reactions) have significantly expanded our ability to improve the performance of existing environmental electrochemical technologies and develop new ones. Advances in electrode materials, porous electrode theory, in situ diagnostics and cell design of porous electrodes allow for enhanced understanding and improved system development. In this symposium, we invite scientists to share their latest results of innovative processes, novel materials and enhanced theoretical understanding in the field of porous (capacitive and/or faradaic) electrodes for environmental applications.

Symposium Organizers
Maarten Biesheuvel (Coordinator), Wetsus Leeuwarden and Wageningen University, the Netherlands
(maarten.biesheuvel@wetsus.nl)
Chong Zheng Na, University of Notre Dame, USA
Matthew Suss, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
Linda Zou, University of South Australia, Australia

Invited speakers


Symposium 10:

Electroactive, Functionalized and Nanostructured Materials and Composites: Modern Trends in Synthesis and Applications
Sponsored by: Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

The symposium is designed to cover an extensive area of various materials and composites of electrochemical interest, including electroactive/conjugated polymers, mixed electron-ion inorganic conductors, lithium-ion intercalation materials, various electrochemistry-related composite materials. Both their synthesis and applications will be among topics of this symposium. Especial accent will be made on original routes to synthesis of such materials and their composites, on systems possessing unusual properties, on their advanced applications in molecular electrochemistry, electroanalysis, (electro)catalysis and (bio)sensors, actuators, electrochemical energy and electrochromic devices, solar energy conversion, micro- and nanoelectronics.

Symposium Organizers
Magdalena Skompska (Coordinator), University of Warsaw, Poland (mskomps@chem.uw.edu.pl)
Peter Bressers, TNO, the Netherlands
Marilia O.F. Goulart, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil
Francesco Paolucci, Università di Bologna, Italy
Philippe Vereecken, IMEC, Belgium
Mikhail Vorotyntsev, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia


Symposium 11:

Electrochemical Engineering for Improvement of Process Sustainability
Sponsored by: Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology

Electrochemical engineering and technology have been employed for improvement of processes in various areas. This Symposium is to be focused on sustainable production of valuable compounds, beneficiation of wastes and side-products together with environment protection, through integration of recently developed materials into the process, and improvement of engineering technology and related concepts.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Development and integration of new electrode materials and components in electrochemical processes
• Application of new electrosynthesis routes and techniques to processes of industrial relevancy
• Improvement in cell design and operation for the reduction of corrosion issues
• Advances in hydrometallurgical processes for improved recovery of strategic metals
• Remediation assisted by electrochemical processes
• Recent progresses in environment protection processes, in particular for removal of trace pharmaceutical and microbial pollutants in waters
• Coupling green, renewable energy to electrochemical processes
• Beneficiation of organic waste by bioelectrochemical processes
• Modelling and scale up of electrochemical processes from bench scale to the plant
• Position of electrochemical processes in industrial processes for chemicals production

Symposium Organizers
Juan Peralta (Coordinator), Universidad de Guanajuato, Mexico
(juan.peralta@ugto.mx)
François Lapicque, Université de Lorraine, France
Guido Mul, Twente University, the Netherlands
Manuel Rodrigo, Universidad de Castilla-la-Mancha, Spai


Symposium 12:

EC Power Sources: Principles of Materials, Design and Operation
Sponsored by: Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

This symposium addresses critical engineering challenges and opportunities associated with electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies, including batteries, fuel cells, electrolyzers, capacitors, and solar cells. Particular emphasis is on multi-/interdisciplinary approaches and solutions that contribute to bridging the gap between scientific advances and device functionality.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Design of novel component and cell architectures
• Membrane electrode assembly integration
• Transport phenomena, including thermal and water management
• Computational modeling and simulation of performance and durability
• Interactions between electrochemistry and mechanics
• System integration and hybridization
• In situ diagnostics and health monitoring
• System design and operation under extreme conditions
• Integration of new materials and cell components to large FC stacks
• Heat integration in combined heat and power units with innovative FC components
• Advances in hybridization of energy converters for optimal heat or power delivery
• Ageing issues induced by particular operation, in particular by hybridation
• Strategy for energy delivery for higher durability of FC systemss

Symposium Organizers
Deborah Jones (Coordinator), Université de Montpellier, France (deborah.jones@univ-montp2.fr)
Peter Bouwman, HyET, the Netherlands
Eril Kjeang, Simon Fraser University, Canada
François Lapicque, Université de Lorraine, Franc


Symposium 13:

Corrosion: The Electrochemistry of Corrosion and Approaches to Corrosion Protection
Sponsored by: Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

The symposium will cover all aspects of the corrosion behaviour from fundamental studies of passivity and its breakdown to industrial corrosion and protection. Of particular interest are in operando studies of the local electrochemistry of corrosion processes and electrochemical approaches to corrosion protection, including coatings and inhibitor technology. Papers which provide new insights or methods for understanding corrosion mechanisms will be particularly welcome.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Passive oxide film and surface scales: formation, chemistry, structure and properties
• Advanced or novel electrochemical techniques for studying corrosion and surface treatments
• Novel approaches to corrosion protection, including smart coatings and inhibitors

Symposium Organizers
Mary P. Ryan (Coordinator), Imperial College London, UK (m.p.ryan@imperial.ac.uk)
Nick Birbilis, Monash University, Australia
Shinji Fujimoto, Osaka University, Japan
Santiago Garcia, Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands
Wouter Hamer, Shell, the Netherlands
Herman Terryn, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium


Symposium 14:

Combined Electro and Electrophoretic Deposition for Advanced Materials Synthesis
Sponsored by: Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

The symposium is designed to cover the area of electrochemical technology involving electroplating, electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and their combinations. Contributions covering the synergistic use of electrodeposition (ED) and EPD are particularly encouraged.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Synthesis of novel composite materials by the synergistic combination of ED and EPD , for a range of diverse applications
• Advances in electrophoretic deposition approaches involving co-deposition of polymer molecules and inorganic (nano)particles
• In situ characterization of deposition processes (e.g. scanning probe or electron microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy)

In addition, contributions that address the understanding of colloidal stability, deposition kinetics, and transport will be considered, and papers which discuss mechanistic aspects of co-deposition will be particularly welcome.

Symposium Organizers
Aldo R. Boccaccini (Coordinator), University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany (aldo.boccaccini@ww.uni-erlangen.de)
Begona Ferrari, CSIS Madrid, Spain
Arjan Mol, Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands
Marcel J. Rost, Leiden University, the Netherlands
Mary P. Ryan, Imperial College London, UK
Giovanni Zangari, University of Virginia, USA


Symposium 15:

New Molecules - Synthesis, Fundamental Electron Transfer Properties and their Relationship with Molecular Action
Sponsored by: Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

Every day, new molecules are synthesized as promising catalysts, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, explosives, dyes, sensors, photosensitizers, redox switches. Their expected application is based on their readiness to be oxidized or reduced, along with the stability of their radical intermediates. These effects are of importance in understanding their electrochromic properties, electrogenerated luminescence abilities, related to their electron delocalization connected and are also determined by their capacity to form host-guest supramolecular systems. Before developing a given application, fundamental and detailed electrochemical studies on the molecular level are necessary to characterize the basic properties of the new molecules, to elucidate the reaction mechanisms involved, to find the ways for fine-tuning their properties. This allows the design of more new experimental systems and is also important to validate the experimental results using theoretical calculations. This combined strategy is useful for improving our knowledge in both the intrinsic properties of the new materials and to develop new potential applications with them. This symposium has a general and fundamental character, therefore colleagues from all divisions working with individual molecules could be interested, where the common discussion and exchange of experiences would be fruitful.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• Electrochemical studies on organic, inorganic and organometallic molecules
• In situ and/or ex situ Spectroelectrochemical characterization of electrogenerated intermediates
• Studies for molecules or functional materials bearing multiple redox centers
• Theoretical studies of ET processes
• ET-induced electrocatalytic phenomena
• Functional electrodic materials for energy applications

Symposium Organizers
Carlos Frontana (Coordinator), CIDETEQ, Mexico
(cfrontana@cideteq.mx)
Daniel Bélanger, University of Quebec, Canada
Dennis Hetterscheid, Leiden University, the Netherlands


Symposium 16:

Physical and Interfacial Electrochemistry: Progress in Spectroscopy, Imaging and Theoretical Analysis
Sponsored by: Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

This symposium focuses on spectroscopic, structural, electrochemical, analytical and theoretical investigations of the electrified interface with the objective of identifying and quantifying atomic-level phenomena playing important roles in electrochemical adsorption and faradaic reactions. Recent advances in ex situ and in situ experimental methodologies, in combination with progress in the development of theoretical and computational approaches, create suitable conditions for obtaining a detailed picture of interfacial structures in relation to their surface and bulk compositions. These developments are fundamental in recognizing structure-reactivity relationships. The symposium will cover a broad range of topics from fundamental studies of interfacial phenomena, employing a variety of experimental and theoretical methods, to the design, fabrication and characterization of materials of relevance to both well-established as well as emerging electrochemical technologies.

Topics will include but are not limited to:
• New theoretical and computational approaches in physical electrochemistry
• Novel ex situ and in situ experimental methods in interfacial electrochemistry and electrocatalysis
• Interfacial imaging at the meso and nano scales
• Surface structure-surface composition-reactivity relationships
• Ambient experimental techniques
• Vacuum-based experimental techniques
• Rational design of materials and interface
• Stability and degradation of materials in relation to their structure and composition

Symposium Organizers
Gregory Jerkiewicz (Coordinator), Queen’s University, Canada (gregory.jerkiewicz@chem.queensu.ca)
Nuria Garcia-Araez, University of Southampton, UK
Annick Hubin, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium
Ryosuke Jinnouchi, Toyota R&D Labs, Japan
Masatoshi Osawa, Hokkaido University, Japan
Zhong-Qun Tian, Xiamen University, China


Symposium 17:

“Attention: Theory Only”
Sponsored by: Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

The leitmotif for this symposium is simple: when exploring the frontiers of electrochemistry or crossing lines to neighboring disciplines, theory is expected to provide crucial guidance. Relations between structure, properties and performance of any electrochemical material and system must be defined and understood in consistency with basic theoretical principles. This fundamental rationale applies across the board, from molecular electrochemical processes in complex matter, studies of generic interfacial phenomena, assembly and properties of heterogeneous materials (e.g. colloids, porous media, composites), to structure vs function relations in electrochemical power sources. The symposium program will reflect this diversity and it will bring out the tremendous independent value of theoretical electrochemistry. Notwithstanding the provocative title, the symposium is intended to appeal to the curiosity of electrochemists from all backgrounds, be it in experimental or theoretical research.

Symposium Organizers
Michael Eikerling (Coordinator), Simon Fraser University, Canada (meikerl@sfu.ca)
Federico Calle-Vallejo, Leiden University, the Netherlands


Symposium 18:

Electrochemistry, Photoelectrochemistry and Bioelectrochemistry of Artificial Photosynthesis: Recent Advances in CO2 Conversion to Products
Sponsored by: Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

The interest to use carbon dioxide in a circular economy as a raw material and as an energy carrier is coming closer to reality. Worldwide research projects and industries are working on this topic with high priority and there are several concepts to convert CO2 to a valuable fuel for the future. One of the main reasons for this is the availability of CO2 - it is available everywhere and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions it should be a good way to bring these back to the utilization. The CO2 originating from the use of fossil resources continues to accumulate in the atmosphere, accelerating climate change with disrupting impacts on the biosphere. On the other hand one of the main hurdles is the need of energy to utilize the CO2 as a stable molecule and there are several approaches needed to overcome this. The chemical industry which heavily relies on these non-renewable and scarce fossil resources is looking for sustainable alternative resources to deliver the chemicals our society needs without the related environmental burden. While there are important scientific and technological challenges hindering the exploitation of CO2 as a chemical feedstock, it offers great potential to couple environmental protection and economic growth. Today also a rising amount of sustainable energy is produced by using solar and wind and the carbon capture and utilization technologies are an opportunity to store peak energy in an efficient way. One of the major set of technologies being applied towards this end include electron mediated processes such as electrochemistry, bioelectrochemistry, plasmachemistry and photochemistry which are emerging technologies with the possibility to comply with varying energy supply (fast switch on and off) such as renewable energy. The symposium will focus on these specific technologies.

Symposium Organizers
Deepak Pant (Coordinator), VITO, Belgium
(deepak.pant@vito.be)
Monica Baroso, Utrecht University, the Netherlands
Gabriele Centi, University of Messina, Italy
Brian Seger, DTU Lyngby, Denmark
Wilson Smith, Delft University, the Netherlands


Symposium 19:

Electrochemistry in Action
Sponsored by: All Divisions

This symposium will feature invited lectures from electrochemistry experts from industry and public organizations and will highlight applications of electrochemistry in a variety of fields. Some lectures will be coupled to the excursion program on Wednesday afternoon.

Symposium Organizers
Marc Koper (Coordinator), Leiden University, the Netherlands (m.koper@chem.leidenuniv.nl)
Plamen Atanassov, University of New Mexico, USA
Maarten Van Brussel, Metrohm Autolab, the Netherlands


Symposium 20:

General Session
Sponsored by: All Divisions

This Symposium will cover all ISE areas not compatible with topical symposia.

Symposium Organizers
Susana Cordoba de Torresi (Coordinator), University of Sao Paolo, Brazil (storresi@iq.usp.br)
Claudine Buess-Herman, Université libre de Bruxelles, Belgium
Tom Breugelmans, University of Antwerp, Belgium
Yunny Meas, CIDETEQ, Mexico